PROOF!! The early 90’s were actually amazing … musically speaking.

Written by on February 25, 2018


This two hour set originally streamed live over the mysterious black magic of the interwebz on the 15th of May, 2017. I had rabbit hole stumbled into a little research of early 90s releases, and found that there were some landmark tracks and albums that came out in the time crossing the end of George Herbert into the era of Slick Willie. Over these two hours I highlighted two songs from 90-94. This first hour features 1990 and 1991.


And now back to that fictitious speech written by Daniel Quinn for his novel The Story of B.

What was being forgotten while all this was going on was the fact that there had been a time when none of it was going on—a time when human life was sustained by hunting and gathering rather than by animal husbandry and agriculture, a time when villages, towns, and kingdoms were undreamed of, a time when no one made a living as a potter or a basket maker or a metal worker, a time when trade was an informal and occasional thing, a time when commerce was unimaginable as a means of livelihood.


We can hardly be surprised that the forgetting took place. On the contrary, it’s hard to imagine how it could have been avoided. It would have been necessary to hold on to the memory of our hunting-gathering past for five hundred years before anyone would have been capable of making a written record of it.

By the time anyone was ready to write the human story, the foundation events of our culture were ancient, ancient developments—but this didn’t make them unimaginable. On the contrary, they were quite easy to imagine, simply by extrapolating backward.


It was obvious that the kingdoms and empires of the present were bigger and more populous than those of the past. It was obvious that the artisans of the present were more knowledgeable and skilled than artisans of the past. It was obvious that items available for sale and trade were more numerous in the present than in the past. No great feat of intellect was required to understand that, as one went further and further back in time, the population (and therefore the towns) would become smaller and smaller, crafts more and more primitive, and commerce more and more rudimentary. In fact, it was obvious that, if you went back far enough, you would come to a beginning in which there were no towns, no crafts, and no commerce.







  • Put The Message In The Box
    World Party
    Goodbye Jumbo
  • Then She Did
    Jane's Addiction
    Ritual de lo Habitual
  • Boris
    The Melvins
  • Pressure
    The Reality Of My Surroundings

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